Certificate in Queer Theology

Certificate in Queer Theology
(15 Credit Hours)

The study of Queer Theology is one of the four core elements of Whithorn School of Theology and the various academic programs offered. The purpose of this certificate program is to expose students to current theological thinking and how these readings both challenge, extend, and deepen the Christian tradition as well as to welcome and celebrate the diversity that members of the LGBTQIAPP communities, their families of choice, and allies of those communities hope to find within our congregations.

  • Program Objectives

This certificate program will expose students to the variety of voices, hopes and concerns that individuals from the Queer Communities live with on a daily basis. The variety of readings for this program will expose students to the rich and complex theological works from the academe as well as to encourage the student to examine their own theological understanding, spiritual development, and integration of theory to praxis within our faith communities to be as open and radically inclusive as the call of the Gospel. These readings and critical reflection papers that students will submit are expected to identify and examine the inter-locking systems of oppression.

  • Student Expectations

A fifteen hundred word or five page expectation paper is required of the student offering their personal expectations and goals regarding the program and a synopsis of their current understanding of Queer Theology is prior to the beginning of the course work.

  • Certificate Program Outline and Required Texts
  1. Kathleen T. Talvacchia, Queer Christianities: Lived Religion in Transgressive Forms
  2. Robert Everett Shore-Goss, Queering Christianity: Finding a Place at the Table for LGBTQI Christians
  3. Sheryl A. Kujahawa- Holbrook and Karen B. Montagno, Injustice and the Care of Souls
  4. The Embrace of Eros, New Seeds of Contemplation
  5. Marvin M. Ellison and Sylvia Thornson Smith, Body and Soul Rethinking Sexuality as Justice Love
  6. Ellsion and Douglas, Sexuality and the Sacred 2nd Edition
  7. John J. McNeill, Sex as God Intended
  8. Thomas Bohache, Christology From the Margins
  9. Robert E. Goss, Queering Christ
  10. Marcella Althaus-Reid, From Feminist Theology to Indecent Theology
  11. Nancy J. Gorsuch, Introducing Feminist Pastoral Care and Counseling
  12. Lisa Isherwood and Elizabeth Stuart, Introducing Body Theology
  13. Sarah Rudin, Paul among His People
  14. Steven Greenberg, Wrestling with God & Men
  15. Robert E. Goss and Mona West, Take Back the Word a Queer Reading of the Bible
  16. Patrick S. Cheng, Radical Love An Introduction to Queer Theology
  17. Marie Alford-Harkey and Rev. Debra W. Haffner, Bisexuality: Making the Invisible Visible in Faith Communities
  18. Megan K. De Franza, Sex Differences in Christian Theology
  19. Andy Buechel, That We Might Become God
  20. Susannah Cornwall, Controversies in Queer Theology
  • Reaction Paper

A fifteen hundred word or five page paper reaction paper demonstrating critical thinking is required for each of the reading selections. The reaction paper is to serve as a talking paper in lieu of discussion held during actual class time.

  • Practicum

Students will keep a journal in which to record notes, meditations, impressions, and ministerial applications of the various readings.

  • Final Paper

At the completion of the program the student will write a final fifteen hundred word or five page paper detailing their personal journey and how these readings have/ not challenged, extended and enriched their theological understanding of Queer Theology/Queer Studies.

  • Method of Evaluation

-Expectation Paper 5%
-Reaction Papers 50%
-Practicum 30%
-Final Paper 15%

Doctor of Ministry

Doctor of Ministry (D. Min.)

This is a degree for the professional clergyman, who can demonstrate twelve (12) years in active Christian Ministry
but has not had any formal academic training. Admission to this program requires an entrance examination and the
12 years of ministry must be documented to be of a full time, professional nature. The student is expected to
undertake degree work much the same as for the Th. D. requirements.

Doctor of Theology

Doctor of Theology (Th. D.)

This degree is designed for students with a graduate degree in religion, a M. Div., or its equivalent, who wish to
pursue research in original research in areas within the scope of Independent/Old Catholic or Celtic Christian belief
and practice.

This requires two full years (24 months) under the direction of assigned members of the faculty
program. A dissertation must be submitted at the end of the research experience, contributing original work to the
body of understanding in the field of study.

All research work may be completed at the student’s location, but the
defense of the dissertation must be done on campus and in person. This provision does not suggest that the
student’s research committee may not require personal meetings.

Certificate in Mindfulness

Certificate in Mindfulness
(15 Credit Hours)

  • Program Objectives

The Certificate in Mindfulness program is specifically designed to provide a strong foundation in the history,practice, and theory of mindfulness from within a Christian perspective and to provide for an overview of various prayer forms, traditions, and meditations

This program is especially suitable for Christian clergy, health and wellness professionals, counselors, social workers, and educators who desire to develop a practice of mindfulness for themselves and who might also wish to share such a practice with parishioners, colleagues, and clients.

  • Student Expectations

A fifteen hundred word or five page expectation paper is required of the student offering his or her personal expectations and goals regarding the course and a synopsis of what his or her current understanding of mindfulness prior to beginning the course work.

  • Certificate Program Outline and Required Texts
  1. Richard H. H. Johnston, Introducing Christian Mindfulness
  2. Richard H. H. Johnston, Christian Mindfulness: Are You Living On AutoPilot?
  3. Holly Sprink, Faith Postures: Cultivating Christian Mindfulness
  4. Thomas Merton, New Seeds of Contemplation
  5. St. John of the Cross, Dark Night of the Soul
  6. Karl Pruter, The Mystic Path
  7. Karl Pruter, One Day With God
  8. Patricia Ann Kasten, Linking Your Beads: The Rosary’s History, Mysteries, Prayers
  9. Thomas Merton, The Inner Experience: Notes on Contemplation
  10. David Frenette, The Path of Centering Prayer
  11. Thomas à Kempis, The Imitation of Christ
  12. Daniel Burke, Navigating the Interior Life: Spiritual Direction and the Journey to God
  13. Thomas Moore, The Re-Enchantment of Everyday Life
  14. John Bartunek, A Guide to Christian Meditation: How to Engage More Deeply in Personal Prayer
  15. Thomas Keating, Reflections on the Unknowable
  • Reaction Paper

A fifteen hundred word or five page reaction paper is required for each of the reading selections The reaction paper is to serve as a talking paper in lieu of discussion held during actual class time.

  • Practicum

Students will keep a journal in which to record notes, meditations, impressions, and ministerial applications of mindfulness within their day to day lives for the duration of the program. Students will be expected to fill one page of their journal every day while enrolled in the program.

  • Final Paper

At the completion of the program the student will write a final fifteen hundred word or five page essay detailing his or her personal journey and discovery of what mindfulness means to them within the 21st century and the implications of such within the context of his or her own life and ministry.

  • Method of Evaluation

-Expectation Paper 5%
-Reaction Papers 50%
-Practicum 30%
-Final Paper 15%

Certificate in Christian Mysticism

Certificate in Christian Mysticism
(15 Credit Hours)

  • Program Objectives

This contemplative term is specifically designed for an overview into the great mystics of the church, various prayer traditions, and meditations. This term is designed for a “walk on the mystical side of the faith.”

  • Student Expectations

A fifteen hundred word or five page expectation paper is required of the student offering his or her personal expectations and goals regarding the course and a synopsis of what his or her current understanding of Christian mysticism and prayer prior to beginning the course work.

  • Certificate Program Outline and Required Texts
  1. Evelyn Underhill, Mysticism
  2. Karl Pruter, The Teachings of the Great Mystics
  3. Karl Pruter, The Mystic Path
  4. Karl Pruter, One Day With God
  5. Patricia Ann Kasten, Linking Your Beads: The Rosary’s History, Mysteries, Prayers
  6. Daniel P. Guernsey, Adoration: Eucharistic Texts and Prayers Throughout Church History
  7. David Frenette, The Path of Centering Prayer
  8. Thomas à Kempis, The Imitation of Christ
  9. St. John of the Cross, Dark Night of the Soul
  10. J.K. Kadowaki S.J., Zen and the Bible: A Priest’s Experience
  11. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, Hymn of the Universe
  12. Thomas Moore, The Re-Enchantment of Everyday Life
  13. Karl Rahner, On Prayer
  14. Matthew Fox and Rupert Sheldrake, Natural Grace
  15. Thomas Keating, Reflections on the Unknowable
  • Reaction Paper

A fifteen hundred word or five page reaction paper is required for each of the reading selections The reaction paper is to serve as a talking paper in lieu of discussion held during actual class time.

  • Practicum

Students will keep a journal in which to record notes, meditations, impressions, and ministerial applications of Christian mysticism and prayer within their day to day lives for the duration of the program. Students will be expected to fill one page of their journal every day while enrolled in the program.

  • Final Paper

At the completion of the program the student will write a final fifteen hundred word or five page essay detailing his or her personal journey and discovery of what Christian mysticism and prayer means to them within the 21st century and the implications of such within the context of his or her own life and ministry.

  • Method of Evaluation

-Expectation Paper 5%
-Reaction Papers 50%
-Practicum 30%
-Final Paper 15%

Certificate in the Social Gospel

Certificate in the Social Gospel
(15 Credit Hours)

  • Program Objectives

This term is offered in the effort of training men and women in preaching the Gospel in thought, word, and deed and to aid him or her in mirroring God’s love in a broken world, a role which has traditionally been done within the sacred order of the diaconate. During this term the student will come face to face with a Social Gospel and become familiar with what it means to carry the Good News to the hurting, the poor, the lost, and the marginalized of the 21st century and its application in today’s society.

  • Student Expectations

A fifteen hundred word or five page expectation paper is required of the student offering his or her personal expectations and goals regarding the course and a synopsis of what his or her current understanding of Christian theology prior to beginning the course work.

  • Certificate Program Outline and Required Texts
  1. Bruce Bawer, Stealing Jesus: How Fundamentalism Betrays Christianity
  2. Barbara Brown Taylor, Gospel Medicine
  3. Philip Gulley and James Mulholland, If Grace Is True: Why God Will Save Every Person
  4. Marilyn Alexander and James Preston, We Were Baptized Too
  5. John Shelby Spong, A New Christianity for a New World
  6. Matthew Fox, Original Blessing
  7. Matthew Fox, Creation Spirituality
  8. Mel White, Stranger at the Gate
  9. Richard Cleaver, Know My Name: A Gay Liberation Theology
  10. Dorthee Soelle, On Earth as in Heaven: A Liberation Spirituality of Sharing
  11. Brian D. McLaren, A Generous Orthodoxy
  12. Brennan Manning, The Ragamuffin Gospel: Good News for the Bedraggled, Beat-Up, and Burnt Out
  13. Sara Miles, Take This Bread: A Radical Conversion
  14. Gaylord Enns, Love Revolution: Rediscovering the Lost Command of Jesus
  15. Rosemary Radford Ruether, Sexism and God-Talk: Toward a Feminist Theology
  • Reaction Paper

A fifteen hundred word or five page reaction paper is required for each of the reading selections The reaction paper is to serve as a talking paper in lieu of discussion held during actual class time.

  • Practicum

Students will keep a journal in which to record notes, meditations, impressions, and ministerial applications of the Social Gospel within their day to day lives for the duration of the program. Students will be expected to fill one page of their journal every day while enrolled in the program.

  • Final Paper

At the completion of the program the student will write a final fifteen hundred word or five page essay detailing his or her personal journey and discovery of what the Social Gospel means to them within the 21st century and the implications of such within the context of his or her own life and ministry.

  • Method of Evaluation

-Expectation Paper 5%
-Reaction Papers 50%
-Practicum 30%
-Final Paper 15%

Certificate in Christian Theology

Certificate in Christian Theology
(15 Credit Hours)

  • Program Objectives

An introduction traditional and progressive theological issues. This course deals with an understanding of the systematic positions of the major theologians of the Christian Church. A close look at the theology of the Independent Sacramental Movement is attempted. There is a focus on the students ability to discuss doctrine in terms of one’s own convictions as well as the historic traditions of the one, holy, and apostolic catholic church and the Independent Sacramental Movement as a part of it.

  • Student Expectations

A fifteen hundred word or five page expectation paper is required of the student offering his or her personal expectations and goals regarding the course and a synopsis of what his or her current understanding of Christian theology prior to beginning the course work.

  • Certificate Program Outline and Required Texts
  1. Hans Kung, Christianity: Essence, History, and Future
  2. John F. Gavin and John P. Manoussakis, A Celtic Christology: The Incarnation according to John Scottus Eriugena
  3. Mark Chapman, Anglican Theology: Doing Theology
  4. Robert Barron, Exploring Catholic Theology: Essays on God, Liturgy, and Evangelization
  5. Matthew Spinka, Christian Thought From Erasmus to Berdyaev
  6. Kallistos Ware, The Orthodox Way
  7. J. B. Lightfoot, The Apostolic Fathers
  8. C.B. Moss, The Old Catholic Movement: It’s Origins and History
  9. Allison C. FitzSimmons, The Cruelty of Heresy
  10. Anthony B. Bradley, Liberating Black Theology: The Bible and the Black Experience in America
  11. Casimir F. Durand, The Old Catholic Church and Other Writings
  12. Patrick S. Cheng, Radical Love: An Introduction to Queer Theology
  13. Karl Pruter, The Old Catholic Church
  14. Leonardo Boff and Clodovis Boff, Introducing Liberation Theology
  15. Anne M. Clifford, Introducing Feminist Theology
  • Reaction Paper

A fifteen hundred word or five page reaction paper is required for each of the reading selections The reaction paper is to serve as a talking paper in lieu of discussion held during actual class time.

  • Practicum

Students will keep a journal in which to record notes, meditations, impressions, and ministerial applications of Christian theology within their day to day lives for the duration of the program. Students will be expected to fill one page of their journal every day while enrolled in the program.

  • Final Paper

At the completion of the program the student will write a final fifteen hundred word or five page essay detailing his or her personal journey and discovery of what Christian theology means to them within the 21st century and the implications of such within the context of his or her own life and ministry.

  • Method of Evaluation

-Expectation Paper 5%
-Reaction Papers 50%
-Practicum 30%
-Final Paper 15%

Certificate in Liturgics

Certificate in Liturgics
(15 Credit Hours)

  • Program Objectives

This certificate program is an introduction to an understanding of the principles of liturgy. There is specific study of the various aspects of Celtic Christian liturgy. Students are expected to provide a demonstration of an understanding of the liturgy. They will study the significance of the calendar, the use of liturgical symbols and colors, and the historic use of music and sometimes dance. The nature and meaning of the rites of the Order of the Shepherd’s Heart will be studied, and the student will be expected to perform the various rituals of the OSH. An understanding of the importance of all the Sacraments of the church will be included in this course and the student will be asked to exhibit a working understanding of the doctrine and theology behind each of them.

  • Student Expectations

A fifteen hundred word or five page expectation paper is required of the student offering his or her personal expectations and goals regarding the course and a synopsis of what his or her current understanding of the liturgics of the church prior to beginning the course work.

  • Certificate Program Outline and Required Texts
  1. Dom Alcuin Reid, The Organic Development of The Liturgy
  2. F. E. Warren, The Liturgy and Ritual of the Celtic Church
  3. Brian E. Brown, ed., The Collected Liturgical Material for Use in Christ Catholic Church
  4. H. Norris, Church Vestments
  5. Harvey Cox, The Feast of Fools: A Theological Essay on Festivity and Fantasy
  6. Dom Gregory Dix, Shape of the Liturgy
  7. Pat Robson, A Celtic Liturgy
  8. Northumbrian Community, Celtic Daily Prayer
  9. William John Fitzgerald, A Contemporary Celtic Prayer Book
  10. Brendan O’Malley, A Celtic Eucharist
  11. Leonel L. Mitchell, The Meaning of Ritual
  12. Andrew Burnham, Heaven and Earth in Little Space: The Re-Enchantment of Liturgy
  13. Constance McIntyre, Answering The Call: A Study of Liturgical Dance
  14. Andre J. W. Queen, Oremus: A Prayerbook for the Old Catholic Priest
  15. Alan R. Kemp, A Free Catholic Concise Liturgy: And Other Useful Writings
  • Reaction Paper

A fifteen hundred word or five page reaction paper is required for each of the reading selections The reaction paper is to serve as a talking paper in lieu of discussion held during actual class time.

  • Practicum

Students will keep a journal in which to record notes, meditations, impressions, and ministerial applications of the liturgics of he church within their day to day lives for the duration of the program. Students will be expected to fill one page of their journal every day while enrolled in the program.

  • Final Paper

At the completion of the program the student will write a final fifteen hundred word or five page essay detailing his or her personal journey and discovery of what the liturgics of the church mean to them within the 21st century and the implications of such within the context of his or her own life and ministry.

  • Method of Evaluation

-Expectation Paper 5%
-Reaction Papers 50%
-Practicum 30%
-Final Paper 15%

Certificate in the Cure of Souls

Certificate in Cure of the Souls
(15 Credit Hours)

  • Program Objectives

This certificate program will attempt to teach all of the dynamics available to the pastor for spiritual healing and study of the resources available in the community for referral. There is emphasis on the danger of amateur and non-professional psychological counseling.

A detailed look at the history and practice of healing the whole personality of people of faith by prayer and sacrament. The scope of the course will examine the methods and use of exorcism, the Sacrament of Unction, and the laying on of hands and other principles implicit in the “cure of souls.” The course will look at specific use of spiritual counseling for bereavement, preparation for the Sacrament of marriage, and the many spiritual problems that arise as the members of the community turn to their clergy for spiritual strength. Emphasis will be placed upon the use of the professional resources in the community for specific needs in medicine and psychological and how to use these services to the fullest. This course will discuss and develop techniques in the use of effective prayer as a healing process.

  • Student Expectations

A fifteen hundred word or five page expectation paper is required of the student offering his or her personal expectations and goals regarding the course and a synopsis of what his or her current understanding of the Cure of Souls prior to beginning the course work.

  • Certificate Program Outline and Required Texts
  1. Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
  2. Annemarie S. Kidder, Making Confession, Hearing Confession: A History of the Cure of Souls
  3. C. G. Jung, Psychology and Religion
  4. Andrew Martin, Love Is an Orientation: Elevating the Conversation with the Gay Community
  5. John O’Donohue, Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom
  6. John Shelby Spong, Living In Sin?: A Bishop Rethinks Human Sexuality
  7. Gary Chapman, The Five Love Languages
  8. C.S. Lewis, The Four Loves
  9. Gerald G. May, Addiction and Grace
  10. Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, On Death and Dying
  11. Harold Ivan Smith, When Your People Are Grieving
  12. C.S. Lewis, A Grief Observed
  13. Matthew Fox, Sins of the Spirit, Blessings of the Flesh
  14. Morton T. Kelsey, Healing and Christianity
  15. Thomas Keating, Divine Therapy and Addiction
  • Reaction Paper

A fifteen hundred word or five page reaction paper is required for each of the reading selections The reaction paper is to serve as a talking paper in lieu of discussion held during actual class time.

  • Practicum

Students will keep a journal in which to record notes, meditations, impressions, and ministerial applications of the Cure of Souls within their day to day lives for the duration of the program. Students will be expected to fill one page of their journal every day while enrolled in the program.

  • Final Paper

At the completion of the program the student will write a final fifteen hundred word or five page essay detailing his or her personal journey and discovery of what the Cure of Souls mean to them within the 21st century and the implications of such within the context of his or her own life and ministry.

  • Method of Evaluation

-Expectation Paper 5%
-Reaction Papers 50%
-Practicum 30%
-Final Paper 15%

Certificate in Biblical Studies

Certificate in Biblical Studies
(15 Credit Hours)

  • Program Objectives

The Lector was historically the person who read the Psalms at meal time, but he or she also taught the brothers and sisters of communities how to read and write. Usually this person was in charge of the Scriptorium.

Introduction to the Bible. Basic introduction into the history and development of the Bible. General Knowledge of the content of the Old and New Testaments including a working knowledge of the exegetical method and exegetical experience in selected Biblical texts. The student is expected to exercise a general familiarity with the history and theology of the Old and New Testaments.

  • Student Expectations

A fifteen hundred word or five page expectation paper is required of the student offering his or her personal expectations and goals regarding the course and a synopsis of what his or her current understanding of the Biblical text prior to beginning the course work.

  • Certificate Program Outline and Required Texts
  1. William Barclay, Introducing the Bible
  2. John Shelby Spong, This Hebrew Lord
  3. G. E. Wright, Biblical Archaeology
  4. John Shelby Spong, Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism
  5. John Shelby Spong, Liberating the Gospels: Reading the Bible with Jewish Eyes
  6. John Shelby Spong, The Sins of Scripture
  7. William Barclay, The Apostles’ Creed for Every Man
  8. Raymond J Frontain, Reclaiming the Sacred: The Bible in Gay and Lesbian Culture
  9. Elaine Pagels, The Gnostic Gospels
  10. Elaine Pagels, Beyond Belief: The Secret Gospel of Thomas
  11. Marcus J. Borg, Reading the Bible Again For the First Time
  12. Marcus J. Borg, Evolution of the Word
  13. John Dominic Crossan, How to Read the Bible and Still Be a Christian
  14. C.S. Lewis, Reflections on the Psalms
  15. C.S. Lewis, Mere Christianity
  • Reaction Paper

A fifteen hundred word or five page reaction paper is required for each of the reading selections The reaction paper is to serve as a talking paper in lieu of discussion held during actual class time.

  • Practicum

Students will keep a journal in which to record notes, meditations, impressions, and ministerial applications of the Bible texts within their day to day lives for the duration of the program. Students will be expected to fill one page of their journal every day while enrolled in the program.

  • Final Paper

At the completion of the program the student will write a final fifteen hundred word or five page essay detailing his or her personal journey and discovery of what the Biblical texts mean to them within the 21st century and the implications of such within the context of his or her own life and ministry.

  • Method of Evaluation

-Expectation Paper 5%
-Reaction Papers 50%
-Practicum 30%
-Final Paper 15%