Certificate in Christian Community

Certificate in Christian Community
(15 Credit Hours)

  • Program Objectives

The Porter in the early monastic Christian community was a person who cared for the physical and financial concerns of the whole community, “one who guarded the door”. This course of study is specifically designed to help the student understand the physical requirements of a maintaining a modern ministry. It is a course of study that focuses on finance, polity, church planting and management, building planning, supply and provisions, fund raising and stewardship. It is a very practical and focused term.

  • Student Expectations

A fifteen hundred word or five page expectation paper is required of the student offering his or her personal expectations and goals regarding the course and a synopsis of what his or her current understanding of creating Christian community prior to beginning the course work.

  • Certificate Program Outline and Required Texts
  1. Brother Lawrence, The Practice of the Presence of God
  2. Robert N. Gray, Managing the Church
  3. Paul Zahl, Paradoxy: Creating Christian Community Beyond Us and Them
  4. Kathleen Hughes and Ann Hamlin, Celtic Monasticism
  5. Phyllis Tickle, The Great Emergence: How Christianity Is Changing and Why
  6. Brian E. Brown, ed., The Common Rule of Life of the Order of the Shepherd’s Heart
  7. George G. Hunter III, The Celtic Way of Evangelism
  8. Brian D. McLaren, Finding Our Way Again: The Return of the Ancient Practices
  9. Ian Bradley, Celtic Christian Communities
  10. Nelson Searcy and Kerrick Thomas, Launch: Starting a New Church from Scratch
  11. John Shelby Spong, Why Christianity Must Change or Die
  12. Dan Kimball,The Emerging Church
  13. Doug Gay, Remixing the Church: Towards an Emerging Ecclesiology
  14. Dallas Lee, The Cotton Patch Evidence
  15. Brian D. McLaren, A New Kind of Christianity: Ten Questions That Are Transforming the Faith
  • Reaction Paper

A fifteen hundred word or five page reaction paper is required for each of the reading selections The reaction paper is to serve as a talking paper in lieu of discussion held during actual class time.

  • Practicum

Students will keep a journal in which to record notes, meditations, impressions, and ministerial applications of what it means to create Christian Community within their day to day lives for the duration of the program. Students will be expected to fill one page of their journal every day while enrolled in the program.

  • Final Paper

At the completion of the program the student will write a final fifteen hundred word or five page essay detailing his or her personal journey and discovery of what it means to create Christian Community within the 21st century and the implications of such within the context of his or her own life and ministry.

  • Method of Evaluation

-Expectation Paper 5%
-Reaction Papers 50%
-Practicum 30%
-Final Paper 15%

Certificate in Independent Sacramental Movement Studies

Certificate in Independent Sacramental Movement Studies
(15 Credit Hours)

The Independent Sacramental Movement (ISM) is a term used to describe a sacramental branch of the Christian Church who are not part of the historic sacramental Christian denominations such as the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Church, and or the various Orthodox Churches.

With over six hundred Independent Catholic Bishops and thousands of ministries active in North America alone, it is necessary that the study of the Independent Sacramental Movement is covered within a rigorous and well documented academic program. As such, the study of the ISM is one of the four core educational elements of Whithorn School of Theology.

  • Program Objectives

This certificate program aims to help the student become better acquainted with the traditions and practices of Independent Sacramental Movement. It is hoped that such an awareness will offer the student a broader perspective of the history, traditions, and diversity of the ISM. In order to achieve this goal, the student will be guided through various books from both within and from without the Independent Sacramental Movement.

  • Student Expectations

A fifteen hundred word or five page expectation paper is required of the student offering his or her personal expectations and goals regarding the course and a synopsis of what his or her current understanding of the Independent Sacramental Movement prior to beginning the course work.

  • Certificate Program Outline and Required Texts
  1. Karl Pruter, The Old Catholic Church: Third Edition
  2. Karl Pruter, Bishops Extraordinary
  3. Karl Pruter, The Strange Partnership of George Alexander McGuire and Marcus Garvey
  4. John P. Plummer, The Many Paths of the Independent Sacramental Movement
  5. John P. Plummer, Who Are the Independent Catholics?
  6. John P. Plummer, Living Mysteries: A Practical Handbook for the Independent Priest
  7. R. Joseph Owles, Catholic But Not Roman Orthodox But Not Eastern: An Introduction To The Old Catholic Church
  8. Robert W. Caruso, The Old Catholic Church
  9. Peter F. Anson, Bishops At Large
  10. Henry R. T. Brandreth, Episcopi Vagantes and the Anglican Church
  11. Alistair Bate, A Strange Vocation: Independent Bishops Tell Their Stories
  12. C.B. Moss, The Old Catholic Movement: Its Origins and History
  13. Rob Angus Jones, Independent Sacramental Bishops
  14. Julie Byrne, The Other Catholics: Remaking America’s Largest Religion
  15. Charles Leadbeater, Science of the Sacraments
  • Reaction Paper

A fifteen hundred word or five page reaction paper is required for each of the reading selections The reaction paper is to serve as a talking paper in lieu of discussion held during actual class time.

  • Practicum

Students will keep a journal in which to record notes, meditations, impressions, and ministerial applications of what it means to be a part of the ISM within their day to day lives for the duration of the program. Students will be expected to fill one page of their journal every day while enrolled in the program.

  • Final Paper

At the completion of the program the student will write a final fifteen hundred word or five page essay detailing his or her personal journey and discovery of the history and traditions of the ISM and the implications of such within the context of his or her own life and ministry.

  • Method of Evaluation

-Expectation Paper 5%
-Reaction Papers 50%
-Practicum 30%
-Final Paper 15%

Certificate in Peace Studies

Certificate in Peace Studies
(15 Credit Hours)

“Peace demands the most heroic labor and the most difficult sacrifice. It demands greater heroism than war. It demands greater fidelity to the truth and a much more perfect purity of conscience.” ― Thomas Merton

Justice, peace, and peaceful conflict resolution within a Christian context is one of four core educational elements of Whithorn School of Theology and the various academic programs offered. Christ Catholic Church, WST’s chartering ecclesiastical jurisdiction, strives to be a peace church founded upon the calling of the Prince of Peace and His Sermon on the Mount, the Beatitudes.

  • Program Objectives

This certificate program aims to help the student become better acquainted with the traditions and practices of the Christian Church throughout the ages in regards to an emphasis on peace and peaceful conflict resolution. It is hoped that such an awareness will offer the student the ability and foster the desire to integrate those traditions and practices in his or her own ministry within the context of the 21st century. In order to achieve this goal, the student will be guided through various books of both of antiquity and a more modern origin.

  • Student Expectations

A fifteen hundred word or five page expectation paper is required of the student offering his or her personal expectations and goals regarding the course and a synopsis of what his or her current understanding of justice, peace, and peaceful conflict resolution is prior to beginning the course work.

  • Certificate Program Outline and Required Texts
  1. Thomas Merton, Passion for Peace: Reflections on War and Nonviolence
  2. James C. Howell, The Beatitudes for Today
  3. Robert D. Jones, Pursuing Peace: A Christian Guide to Handling Our Conflicts
  4. Mark J. Allman, Who Would Jesus Kill?: War, Peace, and the Christian Tradition
  5. Michael G. Long, Christian Peace and Nonviolence: A Documentary History
  6. Walter Wink, Jesus and Nonviolence: A Third Way
  7. Terrence J. Rynne, Jesus Christ, Peacemaker: A New Theology of Peace
  8. Brayton Shanley, The Many Sides of Peace: Christian Nonviolence, the Contemplative Life, and Sustainable Living
  9. Emmanuel Katongole, Reconciling All Things: A Christian Vision for Justice, Peace and Healing
  10. Susan Brooks, Interfaith Just Peacemaking: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Perspectives on the New Paradigm of Peace and War
  11. Kenneth O. Gangel, Communication and Conflict Management in Churches and Christian Organizations
  12. Christena Cleveland, Disunity in Christ: Uncovering the Hidden Forces that Keep Us Apart
  13. Paul Zahl, Paradoxy: Creating Christian Community Beyond Us and Them
  14. Daniel H. Shubin, The Gospel of the Prince of Peace, A Treatise on Christian Pacifism
  15. Vic McCracken, Christian Faith and Social Justice: Five Views
  • Reaction Paper

A fifteen hundred word or five page reaction paper is required for each of the reading selections The reaction paper is to serve as a talking paper in lieu of discussion held during actual class time.

  • Practicum

Students will keep a journal in which to record notes, meditations, impressions, and ministerial applications of justice and peaceful conflict resolution principles developed or utilized within their day to day lives for the duration of the program. Students will be expected to fill one page of their journal every day while enrolled in the program.

  • Final Paper

At the completion of the program the student will write a final fifteen hundred word or five page essay detailing his or her personal journey and discovery of the Prince of Peace within the context of his or her own life and ministry.

  • Method of Evaluation

-Expectation Paper 5%
-Reaction Papers 50%
-Practicum 30%
-Final Paper 15%

Certificate in Celtic Christianity

Certificate in Celtic Christianity
(15 Credit Hours)

The study of Celtic Christianity is one of four core educational elements of Whithorn School of Theology and the various academic programs offered. This is a certificate program in the history of the development of the Christian mission among the Celtic tribes of Cornwall, Wales, England, Scotland, the Isle of Man, Ireland and Brittany. It focuses on the ancient Celtic beliefs at the arrival of the Christian mission. The curriculum will look at the lives, writings, and teachings of many Celtic saints, with specific concern for the unique nature of Celtic Spirituality.

  • Program Objectives

This certificate program aims to help the student become better acquainted with the traditions and practices of the ancient Celtic Catholic Church with the hope that such an awareness will offer the student the ability and foster the desire to integrate those traditions and practices in his or her own ministry within the context of the 21st century. In order to achieve this goal, the student will be guided through various books of both of antiquity and a more modern origin.

  • Student Expectations

A fifteen hundred word or five page expectation paper is required of the student offering his or her personal expectations and goals regarding the program and a synopsis of what his or her current understanding of Celtic Christianity is prior to beginning the course work.

  • Certificate Program Outline and Required Texts
  1. Taylor; The Coming of the Saints
  2. Esther de Waal; Every Earthly Blessing
  3. Bede; The History of the English Church and People
  4. Fr. David Adam; Fire of the North: The Life of St. Cuthbert
  5. Shirley Toulson; The Celtic Year
  6. Edward Selner; The Wisdom of the Celtic Saints
  7. Thomas Cahill; How the Irish Saved Civilization
  8. Fr. David Adam, A Desert in the Ocean: The Spiritual Journey According to St. Brendan the Navigator
  9. Fr. David Adams, The Cry of the Deer
  10. James P. Mackey, An Introduction to Celtic Christianity
  11. Philip Newell, Listening for the Heartbeat of God
  12. Timothy J. Joyce, Celtic Christianity
  13. J. Philip Newell, The Book of Creation
  14. Philip Sheldrake, Living Between Worlds: Place and Journey in Celtic Spirituality
  15. J. Philip Newell, Christ of the Celts
  • Reaction Paper

A fifteen hundred word or five page reaction paper is required for each of the reading selections The reaction paper is to serve as a talking paper in lieu of discussion held during actual class time.

  • Practicum

Students will keep a journal in which to record notes, meditations, impressions, and ministerial applications of Celtic Christian practices and principles developed or utilized within their day to day lives for the duration of the program. Students will be expected to fill one page of their journal every day while enrolled in the program.

  • Final Paper

At the completion of the program the student will write a final fifteen hundred word or five page essay detailing his or her personal journey and discovery of Celtic Christianity within the context of his or her own life and ministry.

  • Method of Evaluation

-Expectation Paper 5%
-Reaction Papers 50%
-Practicum 30%
-Final Paper 15%

Honorary Doctor of Divinity

Honorary Doctor of Divinity (D. D.)

The Honorary of Doctor of Divinity is awarded by Whithorn School of Theology very selectively and rarely and never upon independent application. It is included in this list so that students and the general public may recognize the nature of the degree when it is presented.

The Doctor of Divinity degree is presented to people in the general community who have made a significant contribution to religion and Christianity by their work and/or activities.

This degree is an honorary degree and can not be earned by academic means or applied for independently. The person selected for this degree must demonstrate major contributions in Christian care and love, reflecting the highest standards of devotion and self sacrifice over the course of a lifetime.

The candidate for this degree must be selected by the Board of Directors and approved by the Board of Trustees, of Whithorn School of Theology. The degree is seen by Whithorn School of Theology to be a degree issued in Episcopal Recognition and Honor for a Christian life well lived.

Master of Divinity

Master of Divinity (M.Div.)
(90 Credit Hours)

The Master of Divinity program is designed to prepare religious leaders competent to serve in various situations and contexts, and more particularly to provide professional training for church-related ministries. The heart of the program is the required biblical, theological and practical course subjects which provide a broad foundation for an effective ministry within the wide spectrum of churches in which its students will minister, and more particularly within the autocephalous sacramental movement. Prerequisite for entry into the program is a baccalaureate degree and a basic ability in the research, study and writing skills needed in a graduate program of study.

  • Section 1 General or Core Areas of Study

+Introduction to Ministry
+History of Christianity
-History of Celtic Christianity
-History of the Independent Sacramental Movement
+Old Testament
+New Testament
+Christian Doctrine
+Essential Teachings of the Christian Churches
+Current Directions in Theology:
-Liberation Theology
-Feminist Theology

  • Section 2 Moral Doctrine

+Christian Moral Theology
+Contemporary Moral Issues
+Professional Ethics
+Bioethics
+Ecological Ethics
+Conflict Resolution

  • Section 3 Ministerial Needs

+Worship
+Preaching
+Pastoral Care
+Counseling
+Spiritual Direction
+Religious Education
+Queer Studies
-Nature of Queerness
-Ministry to Queer Persons
+Clinical Pastoral Education

  • Section 4 Ministerial Field Placement

+Training in the needs of the student’s specific ministerial choices such as but not limited to religious community, social services, prison chaplaincy, hospital chaplaincy, hospice ministry, campus ministry, et cetera.

  • Section 5 Language Arts

+Recommended: Study of a language, classical or modern, to the level of a proficient reading knowledge.

Master of Arts in Celtic Christianity

Master of Arts in Celtic Christianity (M.A.C.C.)
(40 Credit Hours)

The Christian Church, as it spread into the Celtic lands of the western part of Europe, developed its own particular traits as it influenced, and was influenced by, the Celtic peoples of those lands. This program, building upon the history of the Celtic peoples, studies the Celtic culture and the Christian Church that served it, showing forth all its richness and depth, and at the same time points to the values it can contribute to our Christian life today.

Organization of the program:

– For each topic the student will read one or more books as assigned.
– The student will then write a reflective report on each book read.
– The topics in Parts 1 and 2 are required for all students.
– Each completed topic earns three credits.
– The final research paper earns five credits.
– To be granted the degree the student must successfully complete a minimum of 40 credits.

  • Section 1 – History of the Celts

1. Early history (before Christianity)
2. Celtic Christianity
3. Celtic monasticism
4. Brehon laws

  • Section 2 – The Celtic Christian Church

1. Celtic Mythology
2. Celtic Christian religion
3. Irish penitentials

  • Section 3 – Elective Areas of Study

1. Celtic theology
2. Celtic spirituality
3. Spiritual direction in Celtic spirituality
4. Celtic liturgies
5. Celtic saints
6. Celtic holy places
7. The voyage of Brendan the Navigator
8. The Pelagian controversy
9. The theology of John Scotus Eriugena
10. Celtic Christian communities today
11. Other areas of study are possible, at the request of the student

  • Section 4 – Research and Reflection Paper

Length: 20-30 pages
Topic: student’s choice.

Bachelor of Sacred Theology

Bachelor of Sacred Theology (S.T.B.)
(165 Credit Hours)

The Bachelor of Sacred Theology program is designed to provide the needed theological and spiritual formation for candidates desiring to serve in Holy Orders who may not have any other applicable undergraduate degree work. The program follows the old English tradition of reading for orders during eleven terms of study. To that end, the student will complete eleven certificate programs in a specific order:

Bachelor of Theology

Bachelor of Theology (B.Th.)
(60 Credits Systematic Theology in addition to 60 Credits Biblical Studies)

The Bachelor of Theology program is designed to provide a basic formation in Sacred Scripture and in systematic theology. It is offered to all Christians who want to deepen their knowledge of Scripture and theology, and to all students generally who desire basic knowledge in those two areas.

  • Systematic Theology (60 Credits)

Section 1 Nature of Theology (3 credits)
BT201 What is Theology
BT202 Scope and Purpose of Theology
BT203 General Revelation and Natural Theology

Section 2 Scripture (5 credits)
BT204 Special Revelation
BT205 Inspiration and Authority of Scripture
BT206 Infallibility and Inerrancy
BT207 Canonicity
BT208 Scripture and Authority

Section 3 Nature of God (5 credits)
BT209 Knowledge of God
BT210 One in Essence
BT211 Three in Person
BT212 Incommunicable Attributes
BT213 Communicable Attributes

Section 4 Acts of God (3 credits)
BT214 Decrees
BT215 Providence
BT216 Creatio Ex Nihilo

Section 5 Creation (2 credits)
BT217 Angels and Demons
BT218 The Creation of Man

Section 6 Reality of Sin (3 credits)
BT219 The Nature of Sin
BT220 Original Sin
BT221 Transmission of Sin

Section 7 Promises of God (1 credit)
BT222 The Covenants

Section 8 Christology (8 credits)
BT223 The Christ of the Bible
BT224 The Christ of the Creeds
BT225 The Names of Christ
BT226 The States of Christ
BT227 The Offices of Christ
BT228 The Substitutionary Atonement
BT229 Why Did Christ Die
BT230 The Extent of Atonement

Section 9 The Holy Spirit (6 credits)
BT231 The Holy Spirit in the Old Testament
BT232 The Holy Spirit in the New Testament
BT233 The Paraclete
BT234 The Baptism of the Holy Spirit
BT235 The Gifts of the Spirit
BT236 The Fruit of the Spirit

Section 10 Faith for Today (8 credits)
BT237 Are Miracles for Today
BT238 Common Grace
BT239 Election and Reprobation
BT240 Effectual Calling
BT241 Saving Faith
BT242 Justification by Faith Alone
BT243 Adoption and Union with Christ
BT244 Sanctification

Section 11 The Catholic & Apostolic Church (10 credits)
BT245 Perseverance of the Saints
BT246 The Church: One and Holy
BT247 The Church Catholic and Apostolic
BT248 Biblical Images of the Church
BT249 Worship in the Church
BT250 The Sacraments of the Church
BT251 Baptism
BT252 The Lord’s Supper
BT253 Death and the Intermediate State
BT254 The Resurrection

Section 12 Kingdom Come (6 credits)
BT255 The Kingdom of God
BT256 The Millennium
BT257 The Return of Christ
BT258 The Final Judgment
BT259 Eternal Punishment
BT260 Heaven and Earth Made New

Associate of Biblical Studies

Associate of Biblical Studies (A.B.S.)
(60 Credit Hours Biblical Studies)

The Associate of Biblical Studies program is designed to provide an introduction to the study of Holy Scripture. The program is 60 semester hours in length and provides a foundation for the study of Scripture for all Christians and especially for those desiring to enter the pulpit ministry.

  • Old Testament Survey

    Section 1 Creation and Blessing (5 credits)
    ABS01 Creation
    ABS02 The Image of God in Man
    ABS03 The Fall
    ABS04 The Covenant with Abraham
    ABS05 The Patriarchal Blessing

    Section 2 The Giving of the Law (6 credits)
    ABS06 Joseph, Moses, and the Exodus
    ABS07 The Passover
    ABS08 The Giving of the Law
    ABS09 The Tabernacle
    ABS10 Arron and the Priesthood
    ABS11 Old Testament Sacrificial System

    Section3 The Land and its People (6 credits)
    ABS12 Joshua and the Conquest of Canaan
    ABS13 The Cycle of Judges
    ABS14 The Monarchy
    ABS15 David
    ABS16 Solomon and the Temple
    ABS17 The Divided Kingdom

    Section 4 The Prophets Part I (6 credits)
    ABS18 Elijah
    ABS19 Isaiah
    ABS20 Jeremiah
    ABS21 The Exile
    ABS22 Ezekiel
    ABS23 Daniel

    Section 5 The Prophets Part II (3 credits)
    ABS24 Ezra and Nehemiah
    ABS25 Amos and Hosea
    ABS26 Joel, Micah, and Habakkuk

    Section 6 The Wisdom Books (5 credits)
    ABS27 Characteristics of Wisdom Literature
    ABS28 Psalms
    ABS29 Ecclesiastes
    ABS30 Job

  • New Testament Survey

    Section 7 The Coming of Christ (4 credits)
    ABS31 The Intertestamental Period
    ABS32 John the Baptist
    ABS33 The Birth of Jesus
    ABS34 The Early Years of Jesus’ Life

    Section 8 The Early Ministry of Christ (6 credits)
    ABS35 The Baptism and Temptation of Christ
    ABS36 Jesus’ Inaugural Address and Public Ministry
    ABS37 The Teachings of Jesus: Parables
    ABS38 Interpreting Parables
    ABS39 The Miracles of Jesus

    Section 9 The Later Ministry of Christ (6 credits)
    ABS40 The Caesarea-Philippi Confession
    ABS41 The Transfiguration
    ABS42 The Triumphal Entry
    ABS43 The Cross
    ABS44 The Resurrection
    ABS45 The Ascension

    Section 10 Messages to the Early Church (4 credits)
    ABS46 Pentecost
    ABS47 Expansion of the Early Church – Acts
    ABS48 The Conversion of Paul

    Section 11 Messages to a Growing Church (6 credits)
    ABS49 Romans
    ABS50 1 and 2 Corinthians
    ABS51 Prison Epistles
    ABS52 1 and 2 Timothy
    ABS53 Hebrews
    ABS54 General Epistles

    Section 12 The End Times (3 credits)
    ABS55 Introduction to Revelation
    ABS56 The Christ of Revelation
    ABS57 The Glory of God